Copy the colour – grungy copper as seen at Alexander Wang A/W16

by | 7 Sep 2016

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Colour often takes a back seat at Fashion Week but this wasn’t the case at the Alexander Wang A/W16 show, where Guido created the perfect bad taste style and shade. But while it looks great in New York on a catwalk, can it be converted to the salon? Absolutely, says Jenny Pelter, technical director of the Westrow artistic team. She shows us how…

“For a couple of seasons now, designers have been veering away from styling models in one generic style and instead have focused on each model’s individuality, playing up their unique style and enhancing their natural qualities or personal look,” says Jenny. “This gender-neutral style from Alexander Wang’s A/W16 show is a great example, with the emphasis being on individuality. The cut is a graphic take on a ‘70s-inspired shaggy feather cut and the tomato-orange colour is a vibrant and rebellious shade, inspired by ‘80s punk. Both decades were key fashion and beauty themes at A/W16 shows, with the trend-leading eras also referenced at Gucci, Saint Laurent and Isabel Marant.”

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Step 1: Unless it’s light blonde already, hair will need to be pre-lightened to a light yellow. If hair is naturally mousey brown, only pre-lighten the top section through the crown. If hair is any darker than this, pre-lighten the full head.

Step 2: If hair is naturally mousey brown in the lower layers, section the hair from the underneath of the crown down to the nape of the neck and leave natural. If the natural colour is darker than light brown and the underneath has been pre-lightened, apply a toner in a light shade of ash brown.

Step 3: Now the top crown section needs to be coloured. The aim is to go for an all-over coppery tint, so apply a global colour in a tomato-orange shade. If the client prefers a more wearable option, blend a mixture of copper and bronze tones throughout the top section of hair.

Step 4: As the finished look is intentionally very orange, I’d skip using a toner to avoid neutralising the brassy tones. The finished colour should look bright, edgy, not perfectly done and almost harsh.

 

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