UKI Alfaparf Milano Professional Collection

UKI Alfaparf Milano Professional Collection

UKI ALFAPARF MILANO PROFESSIONAL COLLECTION

A tale of skilful artistry and team work, the latest hair collection from Alfaparf Milano Professional showcases the brand’s portfolio at its best. Commercial colour paired with personalised hair care, the end results are perfect inspiration for a whole host of clients. 

Hair:
Paul Falltrick @paulfalltrick
Lisa Whiteman @lisa_whiteman
Piero Gentile @pierogentilehair
Beatrice Moate @bea_loves_color
Gavin McIntryre @gavinmcintyrehair
Photographer: @aris_akritidis
Stylist: Magdalena Jacobs @magdalenajacobs_fashionstylist
Make-up: Amy Barrington @amybarrington

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“Picasso” By Catherine McElligott At The Hair Shop, Dundalk

“Picasso” By Catherine McElligott At The Hair Shop, Dundalk

"PICASSO" BY CATHERINE MCELLIGOTT AT THE HAIR SHOP, DUNDALK

Finding inspiration in the iconic artist Pablo Picasso, Catherine McElligott at The Hair Shop showcases how hairdressing is a creative art form that generates plenty of masterpieces.

Hair: Catherine McElligott at The Hair Shop, Dundalk
Colour: James McMahon
Photography: Martin McElligott
Model: Keying Ji

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Now Open: IHF Star Team Applications

Now Open: IHF Star Team Applications

NOW OPEN: IHF STAR TEAM APPLICATIONS

The Irish Hairdressers Federation seeks new wave of talented stylists as the competition for 2025 team begins.

IHF star team story

The Irish Hairdressers Federation is launching its annual search to find passionate and highly motivated individuals who will make an impact on the future of the industry. Candidates must complete an application and virtual interview process, those who make a lasting impression on the judges will be invited to the semi finals to showcase a Colour & Cut model before the judges whittle it down to a handful of finalists. Applications close at the end of May.

Here’s what you need to know

  • Applications open to all trainee stylists currently undergoing training and will still be undergoing training by November 2024
  • You have 300 words to grab the attention of the judges
  • Entry is FREE
  • Applicants must be over 16 years of age
  • Applications close Friday 31 May 11:59pm

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Is Your Salon Gender-Affirming?

Is Your Salon Gender-Affirming?

Australian favourite evo partners with The Dresscode Project to help create more gender-affirming salons around the world.

“I’M NOT REALLY A PERSON WHO TENDS TO FOLLOW TRENDS, I LISTEN TO CLIENTS” – WELCOME TO THE NEW ERA OF DYLAN BRADSHAW

“I’M NOT REALLY A PERSON WHO TENDS TO FOLLOW TRENDS, I LISTEN TO CLIENTS” – WELCOME TO THE NEW ERA OF DYLAN BRADSHAW

“I'M NOT REALLY A PERSON WHO TENDS TO FOLLOW TRENDS, I LISTEN TO CLIENTS" – WELCOME TO THE NEW ERA OF DYLAN BRADSHAW

No longer just a hair salon, Dylan’s renovated Dublin space is a lifestyle store for the modern consumer.

Dylan Bradshaw, Dublin

The idea for the refresh of the iconic Dylan Bradshaw salon in Dublin had started gestating before Covid. It had been a decade since the last refit, so Dylan and his wife and business partner Charlotte were keen on a change. Then the lockdowns hit. “It makes you have a serious rethink about what you want to do, where you want to be,” he recalls.

DYLAN BRADSHAW

Dylan Bradshaw

With a reputation for high-end service and luxury experience, would the new era of Dylan Bradshaw see him pare back as the cost of living crisis hit? “We’ve doubled down,” he laughs. “The consumer has changed, and the industry has changed. I’m not really a person who tends to follow trends, I listen to clients. We’re a high-end brand, and our business comes from all over the country. In a world where everybody’s trying to simplify and dumb things down, and I want to give more of a luxury experience. We went from a salon to a store; we’re a lifestyle space now.”

About 18 months ago, the salon increased prices by 25 per cent across the board, giving clients six months’ notice. The cost of running a business had increased, and he had to act accordingly. The business also heavily invests in upskilling staff to ensure that elevated salon experience. “Our job is to take care of people, we’re professionals giving the very best service. At the same time, we can’t be stupid, we must charge accordingly. If you treat it like a serious business, people will take your business seriously.”

Dylan Bradshaw salon ku.fee coffee bar

ku.fee: The speciality tea and coffee shop called with its bespoke La Marzocco Linea PB S ABR espresso machine 

And serious he is, as the careful thought behind the new look business attests. The front of the late eighteenth-century Dublin townhouse – originally occupied by the salon’s front desk – is now a speciality tea and coffee shop called ku.fee. Dylan spent a year tasting coffee roasts to find the perfect choice, has a €12,000 bespoke La Marzocco Linea PB S ABR espresso machine and even completed a barista course with the manager. While it’s a new business for Dylan to reach fresh customers, ku.fee baristas are also on hand to brew the perfect beverage for salon clients as part of their service.

Once inside the store, you’ll discover a carefully curated collection of lovely things in home, hair, beauty and personal care. It’s a shopper’s paradise. And he’s pairing up with Dublin-based barber brand Faction, which will take the top floor of the building. There’s also a space that can be rented for shoots or events, used recently by Hair by Sam McKnight for its Irish launch.

Dylan Bradshaw salon retail

Yes, you can buy shampoo, but you can pick up so much more with  
the curated retail selection

Dylan bradshaw salon backwash

Renovated backwashes: The iconic Gamma & Bross Teknowash Plus units 

Dylan Bradshaw salon

Seating pods: For those wanting to work or enjoy a coffee 

Dylan bradshaw seating pods

Within the hair salon, Dylan hasn’t taken the easy path, opting to reuse and repurpose as much as possible with a firm eye on sustainability. He points to his Gamma & Bross Teknowash Plus units as an example, all stripped, rebuilt and reconditioned with new motors. “It’s not saving money, it would be cheaper and easier to buy new stuff. We have a huge focus on our waste,” he admits. “I want to do better, I want to move in a different direction.”

He’s also ensured with the renovation that the team had a proper space to relax in between clients, rather than a staff room the size of a broom cupboard. “They work hard on their four days, but then they get three days off, and then they come back into the salon focused and ready to work their socks for the business. It’s very important that we have a team that’s happy to work within the space.”

In the middle of the salon, you’ll find six pods where clients can sit and plug in with their laptop and have a coffee (perhaps while their colour develops). The space also feels much bigger, thanks to the clever lighting and more soothing material choices (repurposed Connemara marble, pure oak wood, and terrazzo floors). The reception desk is a long and spacious island, akin to a luxury kitchen to avoid any kind of divide between front of house and guests. It’s all part of the brand becoming more closely knit to its neighbourhood. Has the introduction of the coffee shop confused clients? “There’s a lot of head scratching when people come to the door, they’re not sure. ‘I’m going into a cafe?’,” he laughs. “And I like that, because that means we’re shaking things up.” And that door is open for lots more opportunities to defy expectations…

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TEST: DOMESTIC ABUSE: THE WARNING SIGNS AT WORK YOU NEED TO KNOW

TEST: DOMESTIC ABUSE: THE WARNING SIGNS AT WORK YOU NEED TO KNOW

You suspect your client is suffering domestic abuse. So, what do you do next? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell has first-hand experience

Concerned for the welfare of your colleague or client? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell shares his first-hand experience, so you know how best to help.

You suspect your client is suffering domestic abuse. So, what do you do next? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell has first-hand experience

Concerned for the welfare of your colleague or client? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell shares his first-hand experience, so you know how best to help.

Sam Kerswell

Sam Kerswell, photographed by Lynett Genockey of Harplette Photography with make-up by Tracy Graham

It’s no secret that the hair salon is seen as a safe space by clients – it’s a chance for them to vent, divulge details from their personal lives and chat to hairdressers like old friends. Often, hairdresse rs consider themselves to be agony aunts, but what happens when it goes beyond discussing a new relationship or family drama?

A hair salon can be a lifeline for someone experiencing abuse and may provide a safe place to seek help, be it as a client or as an employee at the space. For hairdresser Sam Kerswell, a survivor of domestic abuse, his clients knew something was up because of him repeatedly cancelling or rescheduling appointments. When they eventually got to see Sam in person, they noticed how his physical appearance had changed because of the abuse he was suffering at home.

Like so many victims of domestic abuse, Sam was afraid to speak out against his abuser, with those in his life none the wiser as to what was causing the bruises, weight loss, and much more besides. Fast forward a year, and he’s now sharing his story to raise awareness and help anyone else who is suffering in silence.

If you’re concerned about a colleague or client, here Sam shares the signs you should be looking out for, and what to do if you’re wanting to offer support but unsure how to help. 

“If you’re concerned about a colleague or client, here Sam shares the signs you should be looking out for, and what to do if you’re wanting to offer support but unsure how to help.”

10 things to look out for

1. Physical injuries: Notice unexplained bruises, cuts, or marks, especially if they occur frequently or seem to be escalating in severity.
2. Changes in behaviour: Look for sudden changes in mood, anxiety, or withdrawal from social interactions.
3. Isolation: If a co-worker or client becomes increasingly isolated, avoids social gatherings, or makes excuses to not participate in group activities, it could be a sign of controlling behaviour from an abusive partner.
4. Excessive absences or tardiness: Consistent tardiness or unexplained absences could indicate the need to hide injuries or emotional distress caused by domestic abuse.
5. Unusual financial strain: Notice if a co-worker or client suddenly experiences financial difficulties, such as requesting pay advances, selling personal items, or borrowing money frequently. This could be a result of financial control or manipulation by an abuser.
6. Fearfulness or nervousness: Pay attention to signs of fearfulness, nervousness, or being easily startled, especially if they seem to be in the presence of their partner.
7. Overly controlling partner: If a co-worker or client’s partner exhibits overly controlling behaviour, such as constantly calling or texting, monitoring their whereabouts, or restricting their communication with others, it could be a red flag.
8. Unexplained excuses or cover-ups: Be wary of inconsistent or implausible explanations for injuries, missed work, or changes in behaviour. Unexplained weight loss and excuses as to why is also an indicator as some abusers limit food intake.
9. Uncharacteristic clothing choices: Notice if a co-worker or client wears clothing that seems inappropriate for the weather or situation, which could be an attempt to hide physical injuries.
10. Expressions of fear or concern: If they confide in you about feeling afraid or concerned about their safety at home, take their words seriously and offer support and resources for help.

“If you’re concerned about a colleague or client, here Sam shares the signs you should be looking out for, and what to do if you’re wanting to offer support but unsure how to help.”

Sam Kerswell with friend Annie Franklin
Sam with friend Annie Franklin
Sam Kerswell behind the scenes
Sam behind the scenes of a photo shoot

How to help

1. Choose a private and safe space: Initiate the conversation in a private setting where the individual feels comfortable and safe. This could be a quiet office or a secluded area away from others.
2. Express concern and support: Begin the conversation by expressing genuine concern for their well-being. Let them know that you’ve noticed certain signs or behaviours that have raised concerns and that you are there to support them.
3. Listen actively: Allow the individual to share their thoughts, feelings, and experiences without interruption. Practice active listening by maintaining eye contact, nodding, and providing affirmations to show that you are engaged and empathetic.
4. Avoid judgment and blame: Refrain from making assumptions or placing blame on the individual for their situation. Instead, focus on validating their experiences and feelings while offering reassurance that they are not alone, and that help is available.
5. Offer resources and assistance: Provide information about available resources, such as domestic violence hotlines, counselling services, legal assistance, and support groups. Offer to assist them in accessing these resources if needed, while respecting their autonomy to make their own decisions.
6. Respect confidentiality: Assure the individual that any information they share with you will be kept confidential to the extent possible, while also explaining any legal or professional obligations you may have to report certain disclosures of abuse.
7. Create a safety plan: Work together to develop a safety plan tailored to their specific situation, which may include steps to ensure their immediate safety, such as identifying safe places to go or establishing a code word to signal for help.
8. Follow up and check in: Continue to offer support and check in with the individual regularly to see how they are doing. Let them know that you are there for them whenever they need someone to talk to or if they need assistance in any way.

By approaching these conversations with empathy, understanding, and a commitment to supporting the individual’s autonomy and well-being, you can help clients and colleagues feel empowered to seek help and make positive changes in their lives.

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