This One Tool Could Transform Your Client Bookings

This One Tool Could Transform Your Client Bookings

This One Tool Could Transform Your Client Bookings

If you’re looking to build your salon brand, consider Fresha a must-have tool to run and grow your business 

Promotion – Fresha

As the social media landscape continues to evolve, having a strong website and social platforms has never been more important for your salon’s online visibility. While great content and engagement will get you so far, there may be one missing ingredient in your perfect progress potion… an online marketplace like Fresha.

Here’s how it works
The marketplace is a hub where potential clients can find, compare, and book services in their local area. Imagine your marketplace profile as your online shop window – it’s the best way for you to make a great first impression and bring new clients straight to your salon’s doorstep.

Most new client journeys start on the internet, and you need to show up in those searches for the best chance of bookings. Having a profile on a platform like Fresha marketplace will boost your local SEO rankings. So, even clients searching on Google are more likely to find your business, especially if you can offer popular services and treatments that set your business apart.

120,000 appointments are booked on the Fresha marketplace every day. Not only is it the world’s largest wellness marketplace, but it’s perfect for showing off your brand, as well as quickly and easily offering discounts or running sales.

A Fresha top tip
Clever pricing is one of your best tactics for winning new clients, and your marketplace profile is there to help you do it. Anyone who browses your services will instantly see how your deals and promotions affect your prices – whether it’s a seasonal flash sale that drives urgency, off-peak pricing to keep your salon busy throughout the day, or last-minute offers to quickly fill un-booked slots.

Treat clients to a better booking experience
With an online marketplace profile, you’ll unlock online bookings for your salon – letting your clients book, rebook, and reschedule their own appointments, 24/7. You’ll cut down your time arranging appointments on the phone and save hours each week, all while filling your calendar even faster.

Nowadays 70 per cent of clients prefer to book online, whether it’s for comfort or convenience, so they’ll love the ease of booking their appointment with you through Fresha. Add clear “Book Now” buttons to your profiles on Google Maps, Instagram, and Facebook, as these are apps your clients use every day.

You can do it all on the Fresha marketplace

With over 18 million monthly users and 120,000 appointments made every day, the Fresha marketplace is the best way to reach new clients, almost effortlessly! Salons typically gain at least 26 per cent more clients after joining the marketplace, and four out of five of those clients return.

Ready to get your salon’s name in lights? List your salon on the Fresha marketplace today, get seen by thousands of local clients, and watch your calendar fill up.

Related

Is Your Salon Gender-Affirming?

Is Your Salon Gender-Affirming?

Australian favourite evo partners with The Dresscode Project to help create more gender-affirming salons around the world.

TEST: DOMESTIC ABUSE: THE WARNING SIGNS AT WORK YOU NEED TO KNOW

TEST: DOMESTIC ABUSE: THE WARNING SIGNS AT WORK YOU NEED TO KNOW

You suspect your client is suffering domestic abuse. So, what do you do next? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell has first-hand experience

Concerned for the welfare of your colleague or client? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell shares his first-hand experience, so you know how best to help.

You suspect your client is suffering domestic abuse. So, what do you do next? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell has first-hand experience

Concerned for the welfare of your colleague or client? Celebrity hairstylist Sam Kerswell shares his first-hand experience, so you know how best to help.

Sam Kerswell

Sam Kerswell, photographed by Lynett Genockey of Harplette Photography with make-up by Tracy Graham

It’s no secret that the hair salon is seen as a safe space by clients – it’s a chance for them to vent, divulge details from their personal lives and chat to hairdressers like old friends. Often, hairdresse rs consider themselves to be agony aunts, but what happens when it goes beyond discussing a new relationship or family drama?

A hair salon can be a lifeline for someone experiencing abuse and may provide a safe place to seek help, be it as a client or as an employee at the space. For hairdresser Sam Kerswell, a survivor of domestic abuse, his clients knew something was up because of him repeatedly cancelling or rescheduling appointments. When they eventually got to see Sam in person, they noticed how his physical appearance had changed because of the abuse he was suffering at home.

Like so many victims of domestic abuse, Sam was afraid to speak out against his abuser, with those in his life none the wiser as to what was causing the bruises, weight loss, and much more besides. Fast forward a year, and he’s now sharing his story to raise awareness and help anyone else who is suffering in silence.

If you’re concerned about a colleague or client, here Sam shares the signs you should be looking out for, and what to do if you’re wanting to offer support but unsure how to help. 

“If you’re concerned about a colleague or client, here Sam shares the signs you should be looking out for, and what to do if you’re wanting to offer support but unsure how to help.”

10 things to look out for

1. Physical injuries: Notice unexplained bruises, cuts, or marks, especially if they occur frequently or seem to be escalating in severity.
2. Changes in behaviour: Look for sudden changes in mood, anxiety, or withdrawal from social interactions.
3. Isolation: If a co-worker or client becomes increasingly isolated, avoids social gatherings, or makes excuses to not participate in group activities, it could be a sign of controlling behaviour from an abusive partner.
4. Excessive absences or tardiness: Consistent tardiness or unexplained absences could indicate the need to hide injuries or emotional distress caused by domestic abuse.
5. Unusual financial strain: Notice if a co-worker or client suddenly experiences financial difficulties, such as requesting pay advances, selling personal items, or borrowing money frequently. This could be a result of financial control or manipulation by an abuser.
6. Fearfulness or nervousness: Pay attention to signs of fearfulness, nervousness, or being easily startled, especially if they seem to be in the presence of their partner.
7. Overly controlling partner: If a co-worker or client’s partner exhibits overly controlling behaviour, such as constantly calling or texting, monitoring their whereabouts, or restricting their communication with others, it could be a red flag.
8. Unexplained excuses or cover-ups: Be wary of inconsistent or implausible explanations for injuries, missed work, or changes in behaviour. Unexplained weight loss and excuses as to why is also an indicator as some abusers limit food intake.
9. Uncharacteristic clothing choices: Notice if a co-worker or client wears clothing that seems inappropriate for the weather or situation, which could be an attempt to hide physical injuries.
10. Expressions of fear or concern: If they confide in you about feeling afraid or concerned about their safety at home, take their words seriously and offer support and resources for help.

“If you’re concerned about a colleague or client, here Sam shares the signs you should be looking out for, and what to do if you’re wanting to offer support but unsure how to help.”

Sam Kerswell with friend Annie Franklin
Sam with friend Annie Franklin
Sam Kerswell behind the scenes
Sam behind the scenes of a photo shoot

How to help

1. Choose a private and safe space: Initiate the conversation in a private setting where the individual feels comfortable and safe. This could be a quiet office or a secluded area away from others.
2. Express concern and support: Begin the conversation by expressing genuine concern for their well-being. Let them know that you’ve noticed certain signs or behaviours that have raised concerns and that you are there to support them.
3. Listen actively: Allow the individual to share their thoughts, feelings, and experiences without interruption. Practice active listening by maintaining eye contact, nodding, and providing affirmations to show that you are engaged and empathetic.
4. Avoid judgment and blame: Refrain from making assumptions or placing blame on the individual for their situation. Instead, focus on validating their experiences and feelings while offering reassurance that they are not alone, and that help is available.
5. Offer resources and assistance: Provide information about available resources, such as domestic violence hotlines, counselling services, legal assistance, and support groups. Offer to assist them in accessing these resources if needed, while respecting their autonomy to make their own decisions.
6. Respect confidentiality: Assure the individual that any information they share with you will be kept confidential to the extent possible, while also explaining any legal or professional obligations you may have to report certain disclosures of abuse.
7. Create a safety plan: Work together to develop a safety plan tailored to their specific situation, which may include steps to ensure their immediate safety, such as identifying safe places to go or establishing a code word to signal for help.
8. Follow up and check in: Continue to offer support and check in with the individual regularly to see how they are doing. Let them know that you are there for them whenever they need someone to talk to or if they need assistance in any way.

By approaching these conversations with empathy, understanding, and a commitment to supporting the individual’s autonomy and well-being, you can help clients and colleagues feel empowered to seek help and make positive changes in their lives.

Related

MILES TWIST – THE ONES TO WATCH

MILES TWIST – THE ONES TO WATCH

MILES TWIST - THE ONES TO WATCH

Not just creative director at Architect Hair, Leeds, but also a session stylist working in London and overseas, Miles’ regular assisting credits include Adam Garland, Syd Hayes, and Cyndia Harvey. He’s worked on shows including Dior, Gucci and Valentino.

“This year has been tremendous fun – I’ve had some amazing opportunities.”

Follow @milestwisthair

A tip from Miles for entering the It List

How did you get into hair?

I used to work with a photographer who used to be a hairdresser. It was interesting to see a new form of creativity. I turned to hairdressing originally just to fund the photography, but as I continued in the industry it has become a real passion.

What do you love about your job?

The duality of creativity and energy through my fashion work; the wholesome and poignant side of working with people in the salon and transforming their confidence through hair. I love the transformation it can make on a person or a model and how you can change the atmosphere and perception of a person completely with a different style.

Any gripes?

The majority of jobs and agencies pay after 90 days. Invoices often lapse into six months-plus (I currently have three which are over a year). It’s unacceptable and creates issues of only the rich and privileged being able to work in our industry. We must start pushing for it to be the norm to be paid within 60 days of invoicing.

What have you been up to this year so far?

I’ve been first assisting Adam Garland’s shows in London, the highlight being Erdem A/W24 – beautiful hair in the British Museum. I joined Gary Gill’s team for the first time this season, which has been a great experience, and I’ve also been assisting the amazing Syd Hayes – we recently had a shoot with Kate Moss, which was definitely a bucket list moment.

Who in your generation do you look up to, and why?

The Hair Bros for their blending of business and creativity – their style is unique and they have a great way of presenting how they do hair. Lucy Muyanga (@thehair.co) is a peer, amazing hairstylist and friend. She’s killing it and I’m really excited to see where she goes. Finally, Emma Sommers in my salon, who balances three kids with a busy column and does it all off her own back and graft.

What makes you proud about your generation of hairdressers?

Curls and coils are becoming much more accepted, educated on and celebrated. We’re going away from the need for a “specialist” for Type 3 and 4 hair and we’re educating ourselves to deal with all types of hair. Progress in the right direction!

How does it feel to be part of the cohort that’s rewriting the rules of hairdressing now?

The rules of hairdressing don’t need to be rewritten. I feel it’s important to respect the history of hair and the key people who’ve developed our craft. It’s important to evolve the industry from the foundations that we have, to keep pushing boundaries and focusing more on the equality of hair and hairstylists.

Any advice for someone just starting out in hair?

Throw yourself into as many experiences as you can, make sure you have your fundamental foundations of hairdressing locked in and learnt, don’t forget manners and kindness go a long way with hairdressers and clients alike!

What made you enter the It List?

My boss, Louise Howard-Long, insisted I should go for it. I normally shy away from awards but with the age limit coming up and 2023 having been a great year for my career, I felt it was important to go for it!

Any advice for the 2024 entrants?

Choose imagery carefully, write with eloquence and make it more than just hairdressing. Add more to your application and career and look at the bigger picture!

Do you have what it takes to be The One to Watch 2024?

If you’re aged 30 or under, check out this year’s It List competition and submit your entry no later than Monday 20 May.

Related

BIRTE KLINTWORTH – THE VISIONARY

BIRTE KLINTWORTH – THE VISIONARY

BIRTE KLINTWORTH - THE VISIONARY

The senior stylist and educator at Radio, London, splits her time between clients in the salon, leading training sessions and creating collections as part of the Radio Artistic Team.

“I greatly admire individuals who fearlessly embrace their true selves. Authenticity serves as a profound source of inspiration for me. It guides not only how I portray people but also how I express myself.”

Follow @birteklintworth

 

Birte: “I got a lot of recognition from winning”

What attracted you into hairdressing in the first place?

Since childhood I’ve had a deep fascination for hair and been drawn to the touch of it. That led me to cut and style everyone’s hair who would allow me to do it, and naturally my path as a hairdresser manifested.

What do you love about working in hair?

I see creating a haircut like gifting someone. This can be a gift of transformation, an interaction of energy or a feeling of peace or confidence.

Describe your hairdressing style.

Authentic in expression, simplistic in execution and natural in beauty.

Who in your generation do you look up to, and why?

@mustafayanaz, who stuns me constantly with his beautiful creations. I have followed him since I was an apprentice in Germany and he was winning hairdressing awards. Since then,he has been constantly evolving and always manages to create something unusual or provocative.

How does it feel to be part of the cohort that is rewriting the rules of hairdressing now?

It’s so beautiful to be part of something that is ever-evolving and never stays the same. We are part of constant change.

If you could change one thing about the industry, what would it be?

It would be to normalise charging the same prices for men and women.

What made you enter the It List in 2023?

I was so proud of the projects I had created that it felt natural and right to share them. The It List was the perfect platform for that.

Any advice for someone thinking about entering the It List 2024?

Don’t look too much at what other people are doing. Channel your own authentic self.

Do you have what it takes to be The Visionary 2024?

If you’re aged 30 or under, check out this year’s It List competition and submit your entry no later than Monday 20 May.

Related

NORMAN BOULTON – THE SALON STYLIST

NORMAN BOULTON – THE SALON STYLIST

NORMAN BOULTON - THE SALON STYLIST

The ebullient senior stylist and educator at Not Another Salon, London, has completed his first educational tour of the US and has more in the pipeline. Go, Norman!

“I never expected to win but I love the idea of putting myself out there and getting my name known.”

Follow @normanboulton

Describe your hairdressing style.

My passion is with transformation specialist colour work – matching the inside to the outside is my ultimate goal. Oh, and it’s gotta be high-polish, high-shine and expertly finished.

What kind of work are you doing this year?

Colour blocking is IN for 2024 – lots of my clients are experimenting with this trend, especially with black panelling! As always, my clients live for colour they cannot recreate by themselves. 

Who do you look up to, and why?

Lesley Jennison and Sophia Hilton are POWERHOUSES in the industry for balancing global education with their salon work. They make it look easy and have been paving the way for younger stylists like me for a long time. 

What do you love about hairdressing right now?

So many hair artists are offering education and it is so inspiring to see them sharing their skills and smashing sold-out classes! 

How do you feel about helping to rewrite the rules?

The industry is so much more sharing and kinder than it was when I started 10 years ago. Mental health is talked about more than ever before. It feels so good to be a part of that change moving forward.

What would you say to a young person considering a career in hair?

Wear gloves while washing hair! Contact dermatitis is real and can affect your career… And you’ve really got to love it and WANT to do hair. Or it’s not worth it. 

If you could change one thing about the industry, what would it be?

Higher hairdressing apprenticeship wages! So much hard work goes into training and it needs to be rewarded to encourage more younger people to join this amazing industry.

What ambitions do you have for 2024?

I want to keep my education classes elevating! I’ve got 10 classes scheduled in the UK and US and I can’t wait to meet the hair artists who want to level up their skills. I also want to keep my regular clients happy, spoiling them and keeping up to date with their latest news. I love a good old catch up with my regulars! 

What made you enter the It List in 2023?

It wasn’t the first time that I entered and I never EVER expected to win. But I loved the idea of putting myself out there and getting my name known in the industry. 

Any advice for potential entrants for the It List 2024?

Create an entry that you are proud of and make it authentically you. You have got NOTHING to lose. 

Do you have what it takes to be The Salon Stylist 2024?

If you’re aged 30 or under, check out this year’s It List competition and submit your entry no later than Monday 20 May.

Related

DARCIE HARVEY – THE EDITORIAL STYLIST

DARCIE HARVEY – THE EDITORIAL STYLIST

DARCIE HARVEY - THE EDITORIAL STYLIST

Based in Manchester, this talented freelancer is super-comfortable creating edgy hairstyles on set, but also loves the classic, simple and elegant looks that she executes with noted precision. Her work has appeared in Vogue, Grazia, Dazed, Hunger and Huff.

“We are the freelance generation, the ones who decided to be more independent and pave our own way.”

Follow @darcieharveyhair

Darcie: “Getting the recognition felt amazing as a freelancer”

What made you become a hairdresser in the first place? 

Originally, I wanted to be a rock star, but I have zero musical talent. I remembered that the girl who cut my hair as a kid looked like a rockstar and drove a sports car. I’d also read an article that hairdressers were the happiest employees, and that had me sold.

What do you love about working in hair? 

The creativity, people and variety. You can make art with hair. It’s been a gateway for me to meet and collaborate with amazing people. No two working days are the same. 

Describe your hairdressing style.

Feminine, bold, and evolving. 

Describe the work you’ve been doing this year so far.

My New Year’s resolution was to take my career to the next level. So far that has meant assisting and test-shooting more to evolve my skills and update my book. I’m writing this on a flight home from Paris after a hectic fashion season.  

What would you say to a young person considering a career in hair?

You’re about to have so much fun! It’s hard graft mixed with lots of laughter – there’s no other profession like it.

Who in your generation do you look up to, and why?

My fashion friends inspire me a lot. We’ll only see each other at fashion week but recognise what each other has achieved since last season. If one of us gets a job/show that we can’t make we pass it on to our friends. We’ll skill swap. We’ll talk passionately about new techniques we’ve learnt at a show. (To name a few… Kenneth McLeod, Lee Devlin, Leanne Millar, Rosie Grace, Ellie Bond, Stefanie Mellin, Gordon Chapples, Laurie Deraps, ArpatAbdimajit, Poppy Leigh).

What excites you about what your generation is achieving in the hairdressing industry right now? 

Social media has given my generation the opportunity to get clients and work without relying on a boss or shop front to do it for us. We are the freelance generation, the ones who decided to be more independent and pave our own way. Gone are the day of hairdressers tearing each other down, we are a community supporting one another. 

If you could change one thing about the industry, what would it be? 

Pay transparency. I don’t know why we find talking about money taboo. The secrecy surrounding staff pay/commission is very toxic.

Do you have what it takes to be The Editorial Stylist 2024?

If you’re aged 30 or under, check out this year’s It List competition and submit your entry no later than Monday 20 May.

Related